Trees For Small Backyards

 

When we are limited on space, but really want to place a tree in our yard, there are still options to choose from. It just takes a little extra planning and though we don’t have as many options, we still have some really great ones. Here are some great types of trees for small backyards and some things we would need to consider and plan before we make our selection on planting area and type of tree.

 

  • Check before you dig. You don’t want to sever a utility line, irrigation or sewer line.

  • Evergreens can block wind in winter, and deciduous trees can provide shade in summer. Determine whether that needs to be accounted for.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/smb_flickr/4198063964/in/photolist-7oYbab-fEKYWg-c5CFD9-og98Vt-FGgbTy-8Egmno-9gZLCh-ktm8BH-bQCVZR-fhgwJs-c5CMY7-bmPYaV-auZmHS-oQcT4n-pnghMQ-nJiHeV-fLkNyx-dySnY3-eFNNdy-dt4YQ7-51SerB-8guceE-qBPxBt-3aJZfx-7HNhBL-z7dm7-aaMBCJ-nNEYUt-i6goYf-oSA8bQ-a4pAxS-4h1K36-nGgbkj-fpwu1N-bV3DMS-hEgjKe-8Edcpr-8rUaHr-a8v8Ao-8p8xXE-fhMFam-5DmDmy-5WhXag-oxuZgz-jGDo6R-9RKwC9-gmVC5L-rfU59k-bX7W7u-au6A2R
Photo by: Santi
  • If you have utility lines up above, plant trees that stay short and round, or move your area.

  • Find out if the tree you are looking at drops any fruit or heavy pollen.

  • Check for fall leaf color, spring flowering, and fragrance. All these things weigh in your tree choice.

Golden Chain Tree

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/alwyn_ladell/27390556831/in/photolist-HJpLgR-4qDV7D-2sccJd-6NijFq-SBKxH-c1iDwo-c1RHqJ-ePzZdN-ekMSNu-8MT7X4-2scdbG-keS2e7-gDwUPF-bFagZy-c1iE2L-HjuwyD-cMyQCw-buq4JW-RSjSz-2MQFJW-hrMyVs-gMdDMn-t8exPg-ssCnad-Gi6mmz-umPrGY-GhVjG2-ey6bk-ey6bj-4fCoEH-ey6bi-diydkg-fzyyp-ey6bh-fzNtw-gwmAC2-gwmN7H-c7pPf7-8s8sev-2scdx7-8jw36n-8jzZtW-6uHo5Q-LhqaS-8jzTn7-4o6Urz-mk1Ykq-9QYAR8-kmwscx-nb16Bv
Photo Credit: Alwyn Ladell

Grows 25 feet high and wide, and is covered with long chains of yellow blooms in spring to early summer.

 

Japanese Maple

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/stanzim/10884918696/in/photolist-hzS471-s8Zsb2-pSBEi8-djQ7WV-3ZGb3p-8VPMZp-mAw3sM-8U5yh2-72dk8e-dBEQ54-qmMidN-i5aex8-dDYiD8-dw7998-nuCHc9-6haako-dE4Frw-kti5EP-bFprni-4F3kRb-qmjNcd-cjYftW-pVKkke-hBRjh9-dBqwci-7YKCqm-4SZBar-dE4GiN-dE51Co-97pDfz-oT4C6o-88VvLF-gL7cEm-ifvsRa-491EtC-pTFb2p-8R6HHJ-hKZyEy-qwRFWt-pqLrW9-aVhzac-8UdLui-7aQNWU-aVhyGr-pUXT7T-7yKs-smjBfC-hQrhLU-aVhywx-59x5qN
Photo Credit: Stanley Zimny

The Japanese Maple is a stunning landscaping tree that grows slowly to 10-25 feet, depending on variety. Plant where they receive afternoon shade in hot areas and make sure they get adequate water.

 

Kousa Dogwood

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/calliope/164528845/in/photolist-fxfGe-49Vg9P-dbdeW6-c8Xqsm-fHEcUR-6mWa6q-7fUCEw-4QSts7-7ipzKJ-ceC9iq-5ENJZk-nEF3Tx-5ET3g9-5ENHfZ-cdJFUy-49Zjo5-6VJZo1-bXfLKF-eLrnQc-cdJFay-c5VwkN-gQj911-t9aExL-83Nhr2-6sEATx-6sDSM1-6w3e3a-aEXHAM-6E4G4F-6sJKxG-7riKrw-6DSjW7-nGPcE5-GUpgHA-5ENHKg-49ZjzA-bWnhfT-3gLvD-5ET2VY-5mpCbE-ef6gRY-nskKT7-aqjXeg-9Xd19n-bDoizW-2kPfw-eLCNQm-6pbaUZ-6sJKbN-8xPinG
Photo Credit: liz west

Kousa Dogwood has a broader, more rounded shape than a traditional Dogwood, and has the benefit of being more disease resistant. Growing to 20 feet, it blooms pink or white in spring, then turns a beautiful reddish in the fall.

 

Saucer Magnolia

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mrsbluff/3336221545/in/photolist-65P1r8-7Z6qGx-4tZKZd-6qjnjy-4XmXPt-69Y9Ad-onGzYm-5RXvqe-5RXvuc-9mqEKj-opu22H-ByeLt-9Zui6-6qjukE-E5xPb-5S2RiA-6TZi3v-DiP8C-dqEGhT-69Y9yU-E5xPk-dqEJxk-ByeLk-dqESRA-bXugoY-dqESzb-7JCtNz-7Sro6m-bMqvCV-E5xPp-7So6HF-9wTSFx-9knhEu-dqERJs-sbvu5X-e7zydU-9nk8oZ-7TZXVw-saUcxL-FgcFc-dqEGNe-7UnQPw-bry1v5-5RXvhi-7MbxfJ-7NrRYj-dqEGpt-dqERSs-dqES9h-9wpCDR
Photo Credit: How I See Life

You have to love Magnolia for its tendency to produce beautiful, fragrant spring blooms before any foliage appears. Growing to 25 feet, they are moderately fast growers that can grow in part shade.

 

 

 

 

For more details, check out our source: thegardenglove.com

 

 


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