5 Fruits for Colder Weather

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ozmafan/4898902343/in/photolist-8sU9Zv-6J6hgU-9rpHAF-4PcXzi-ePEPMm-ePrBdD-6ViMun-ePD2UJ-ePCzQq-ePD4jj-ePD3aq-HShdSJ-cVzYiN-ePr8NX-ePrHjH-57BMbG-9rpHFt-ePDyyN-6xoeQw-5166wK-6z6KVc-oooASx-o4mFQp-4PcXZv-9SLFfT-6ixmci-ePsjea-ePrZtk-ePtgyZ-a97mjw-duDFYM-qQU9o-5mNsn9-6y19Ah-6TPima-ePr7Ag-ePrYjr-ePsi2c-2hW2Rf-oD2RcJ-adD1RH-d2p1UW-czST9y-8pV881-e4H797-HecXHa-eW7JGz-6Nwy3N-uAT4nz-aCQY1H

Cold weather is often seen as the end to any chances to grow sweet, organic fruit in your garden. Not anymore! Here are five different fruits you can plant in colder weather. Now you can enjoy sweet, amazing tanginess even during the winter.

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Photo by: Paul Long
  1. The first one is peaches. Leaf curl in peaches can be dangerous. This is a fungal disease that affects wet leaves. To avoid this, plant the tree against a wall that faces south and prune them into a fan shape. You can plant three or four types of peaches in one hole. This will save you space/ if you do this you must prune off all the branches, except the ones facing outward.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lanier67/216341826/in/photolist-k7NTu-33HJJq-51oVG1-6MMUHX-rZJaKL-9gycVG-8a63KF-hJygw-5BFfzn-Jgo4S-9hHiHW-dcZT4W-7acdKR-77KuqN-95bQR8-73paTo-dcZkWT-dcZhXC-5BaKY8-9aPRb2-ftdYJX-93Vg1L-hppRDR-BPN2PF-dcZm82-iBVSWw-amPBz8-8ueCRv-8wNqr6-3gLh7Z-a6273w-qyGwBW-nEgbY7-e9XKQH-5h3AHz-Xs9tc-4iATZW-6LaTnt-pcdeJk-5nLmwS-aafKcg-hnBKS9-nbLy5K-4CPhgs-35TQMu-4Ha31M-crtTR7-6K3NGL-cNbgff-4FBVCB
Photo by: Raul Lieberwirth
  1. Grapes is next one. Grapes are great because they are easily trained to grow up and along surfaces. You may want to stick with the American varieties because European varieties often get mildew and root louse, more than the other varieties.
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Photo by: Fabian
  1. Strawberries also belong on this list. There are three main types of strawberries. First, the June-bearing crops. This will give you a large crop in the late spring or early in the summer. Next, the ever-bearing crop. This is for spring and fall harvest.

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